GWC’s 2017 January Virtual Challenge and Tour is Over for the Year

2017 GWC Virtual Journey Map

Here is GWC’s complete 2017 January journey map.

We hope you have enjoyed this fun, month-long event as either a participant or a spectator!

Working out on rowing machines for the month and logging our daily distances on a map created a terrific virtual journey that helped motivate and educate us all!

The virtual journey began at Genesee Waterways Center on January 1, 2017. As part of Concept 2’s annual January Team Challenge, our team captain recorded the daily meters rowed by all members and then ploted the progress on a map and described our journey as we moved farther from GWC. The virtual journey began at Genesee Waterways Center on January 1, 2017.

Our Captain’s daily reports are below. Click on any report to see its member notes, detailed itinerary and historical notes about the area we traveled though. Here’s a link to the virtual map of our jouney. We will continue the trip from Sarasota, Florida next January 1st. GWC finished ranked in the top 7% of teams worldwide in the Concept 2 January Virtual Challenge. Here is a link to the standings.

If you missed the 2017 challenge, put it on your calendar for 2018!

First Week’s Progress

Day 1 - Happy New Year! We Left GWC Today and Arrived in Macedon!

Here is the first daily report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

Our crew so far stands at 10 hearty members. The deadline to join the Challenge is January 16th but we strongly encourage you to join ASAP so your meters can be added to the totals

From the info I have thus far, we had 4 rowers complete a total of 37,700 meters. Not bad for the day after New Year’s Eve partying! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to 1) Log your meters! 2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We stand 121st overall, and 60th among teams with 6-20 members. To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings

Our virtual journey started today at the Genesee Waterways Center boathouse in Rochester, NY. We rowed south a short distance on the Genesee River to the confluence of the Erie Canal. We then headed east on the canal. Our journey took us through the city of Rochester, the towns of Brighton, Pittsford and Fairport and concluded in the Wayne County town of Macedon. A map of our journey can be found here: GWC virtual voyage 2017

Shout outs:
• Patricia Rozzo for most meters of the day at 10,220
• Paul Ipolito for 10k or more
• John Bernfield for 10k or more

If you haven’t yet joined the challenge, go to the Genesee Waterways JVTC page for more information and instructions on how to join, log meters, etc.

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 2 - 48+ Miles today, from Macedon to Weedsport

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 2 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

Our crew now stands at 11 hearty members. The deadline to join the Challenge is January 16th but we strongly encourage you to join ASAP so your meters can be added to the totals

We doubled our participation yesterday and 8 rowers complete a total of 78,180 meters (48.58 miles). We now stand at 115,880 meters (72 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to 1) Log your meters! 2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

As of this morning, we have moved up to 73rd overall, and 39th among teams with 6-20 members. To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings

We started the day in the Wayne County town of Macedon and traveled through Palmyra, Port Gibson, Newark, Lyons, Clyde and finished the day in Weedsport. Along our route we also passed by Marengo Marsh outside of Clyde, the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge.

The town of Macedon was incorporated during the Erie canal construction in 1823. Prior to settlement, the area was home to the Seneca Nation Tribe. It’s named after the birthplace of Alexander the Great – Macedonia, Greece.

Erie Canal construction took place from 1817-1825. It is one of four canals that are part of the 524 mile long NYS canal system. The Erie Canal is 338 miles (544 km) long and runs from Tonowanda (Buffalo) to Waterford (Albany). The Erie canal contains 35 locks and is 12-14 feet deep in most locations. As part of the Canal Recreation Plan of 1995, the Canalway Trail is in the process of becoming an end-to-end multi-use trail spanning the entire NYS canal system. It is projected to be 500 miles long upon completion and is now 270 miles long. The plan includes interpretive kiosks, trailhead parking and boater/hiker/biker camping areas conveniently spaced along it’s entire length. The popular song “Low Bridge, Everybody Down” was written in 1905 by Thomas S. Allen after Erie Canal barge traffic was converted from mule power to engine power.

The Village of Weedsport was incorporated in 1831 and named after Elihu and Edward Weed, merchants who helped found the village. It was originally named “Weed’s Basin” because the town had a basin (boat turnaround) during the Erie Canal era.

Max Meters for the Day: Paul Ipolito – 17,666m

All meters are good meters: George Morgan – 374m
 
Milestones:
Paul Ipolito – 25,000 meters reached

Shout outs:
10k or more
• Paul Ipolito – 17,666m
• John Bernfield – 10,285m
• Mary Clark – 15,014m

5k or more:
• Patricia Rozzo – 6,867m
• Tom Kosanke – 6,820m

If you haven’t yet joined the challenge, go to Genesee Waterways JVTC page for more information and instructions on how to join, log meters, etc.

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 3 - Weedsport to Orsikany - 84 miles today!

Our crew now stands at 12 hearty members. We welcome our newest member, Tamara to the crew!

A reminder… The deadline to join the Challenge is January 16th and we’d love to have more members added to the team. If you are interested in joining us on this virtual journey, we strongly encourage you to join ASAP so your meters can be added to the totals.

For Day 3, 10 rowers complete a total of 135,960 meters (84.48 miles). We now stand at 251,941 meters (156.6 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to 1) Log your meters! 2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

As of this morning, we have moved up in the Team Standings to 49th overall, and 17th among teams with 6-20 members. WOW!! Way to Go Team GWC!!!

We started the day in Weedsport. 5 miles into our voyage, we crossed Cross-Lake and rowed into the Seneca River portion of the NYS Canal System. The Seneca River, also known as the Seneca-Cayuga Canal, took us through the Hamlet of Jacks Reef, Baldwinsville and Liverpool (both suburbs of Syracuse). Liverpool is home to our friends the Syracuse Chargers Rowing Club. Syracuse University’s Boathouse is also located in Liverpool and is named after James A Ten Eyck  who coached the SU oarsmen from 1903-1937. We continued on the Seneca to Three Rivers. Three Rivers is the point where the Seneca River from the west and Oneida River from the east, join to form the Oswego River which runs North to Lake Ontario (The Genesee is NOT the only river in Upstate NY to run North). We continued on the Oneida River and in the community of Brewerton (a census-designated place), entered Oneida Lake. Oneida Lake is named after the Oneida Nation, one of the Six Nations of the Iroquois. The lake is about 21 miles long, 5 miles wide and is very shallow with an average depth of 22 feet. We followed the south shore to Sylvan Beach and Verona Beach on the east end of the lake to Fish Creek and the Erie Canal. We rowed about 22 miles passing through Rome and finishing the day’s voyage in the Village of Orsikany.

Max Meters of the Day: George Morgan – 20,007

Milestones:
Over 25,000 meters reached
Tom Kosanke and JB

Shout outs:
10k+
Tom Kosanke – 13,700
Jen Colby – 14,466
Jen Hayes – 12,900
Jen Brayer – 13,985
Tamara Abbott – 13,941
Jim Reynolds – 12,359

5k or more:
• Mary Clark – 8,022
• JB – 5,400

Day 4 - We Got Almost Almost to Fonda

Our crew now stands at 14 members. Welcome to the crew Lisa and Betsy!

A tip from Coach Ethan for tackling workouts for the challenge… If you are involved with GWC indoor rowing programs, the priority is to do Ethan Curren’s workout plan. His workouts ensure we are training all of our energy systems to increase our fitness and get faster on the erg and on the water when Spring rolls around. If we just do high volume at low intensity, we’ll get really good at going slow. We need to be sure we are getting the higher intensity work in too. That being said, If you wish to get more meters in than the day’s workout plan, they should be low intensity.

The deadline to join the Challenge is January 16th and we’d love to have you join the team, if you haven’t already. If you are interested in, we strongly encourage you to join ASAP so your meters can be added to the totals.

For Day 4, 10 rowers completed a total of 86,588 meters (53.8 miles). We now stand at 336,077 meters (156.6 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

As of this morning, we have continued to move up in the Team Standings to 40th overall, and 13th among teams with 6-20 members. Way to Go Team GWC!!! To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings

We started the day in Orsikany in Herkimer County and continued east into Montgomery County. We rowed through Utica, Frankfort, Little Falls, Canajoharie and finished the day just west of Fonda. A map of our journey can be found here: GWC virtual voyage 2017

Montgomery County was created in 1772 and originally named Tryon County. It was renamed after Richard Montgomery a general who was killed during the American Revolutionary War. Located in the heart of the Mohawk Valley, early settlers included the Dutch, in search of trapping and fur trade and Palatine Germans in search of religious freedom. In the late 20th century, many Amish families migrated from Pennsylvania seeking affordable farm land and Montgomery County is home to one of the largest Amish populations in the country.

Utica is the 10th most populous city in NYS. It’s location on the Erie and Chenango Canals made it a major transportation hub encouraging industrial development during the 19th and 20th centuries. It became a manufacturing center and world-wide hub for the textile industry in particular.

In the 20th century Utica was given the nickname “Sin City” because of political corruption and organized crime. It took an economic downturn in the second half of the century due to deindustrialization and the closure of GE and Lockheed Martin plants. The low cost of living that resulted has attracted immigrants and refugees from around the world.

We passed through the site of Fort Herkimer built in 1740 and attacked by the French in the French and Indian War. Another fort was built during the American Revolution and attacked by the British and Indians. In 1840 both forts were destroyed during the Erie Canal expansion and their stones used for construction.

Beardslee Castle in Little Falls, NY was constructed in 1860 as a replica of an Irish Castle. Burned down and rebuilt in 1919 and 1981. It was abandoned for 3 years, purchased in 1994. It was reopened as a restaurant after 18 months of cleaning and restoration.

Max Meters of the Day: Paul Ipolito – 10,080

Milestones:
Over 25,000 meters reached
George Morgan

Shout outs:
10k+
Paul Ipolito – 10,080
Tom Kosanke – 10,000

5k or more:
• Lisa Norwood – 8,020
• Jim Reynolds – 5,105
• George Morgan – 8.189
• JB – 8,148
• Jen Colby – 7,757
• Tamara Abbott – 7,851
• Betsy Nitsche – 8,887

Day 5 - All the Way Through Albany to the Hudson!

Our crew now stands at 17 members. Welcome to the crew Esther, Patrick and Francesca!

As of this morning, we are 39th out of 427 teams competing in the challenge! We are now 9th among teams with 6-20 members. AMAZING!!!! Way to Go Team GWC!!! To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings

The deadline to join the Challenge is January 16th and we’d love to have you join the team, if you haven’t already. If you are interested in, we strongly encourage you to join ASAP so your meters can be added to the totals. If you have not joined by Sunday, January 8th you will be removed from this email (unless you send me a note saying you want to be kept on it).

For Day 5, 13 rowers completed a total of 118,593 meters (73.7 miles). That’s the 2nd highest we’ve done so far for the Challenge! Keep up the good work Team!! We now stand at 457,121 total meters (284 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day just west of the City of Fonda and continued down the Mohawk River. Fonda was named after Douw Fonda, a Dutch-American scalped in an Indian raid during the Revolutionary War. His family were ancestors to the actor Henry Fonda. Fonda was also home to the first Native American Saint, Kateri Tekakwitha, a Mohawk girl who converted to Catholicism in the 17th Century.

We passed through the Hamlet of Auriesville which has been associated with an historic Jesuit mission that operated in the Mohawk village of Ossernenon from 1667 to 1684, when it was destroyed by the Mohawk. The National Shrine of the North American Martyrs was built here in 1930 and is dedicated to Three Jesuit missionaries martyred by the Mohawks in 1642 and 1646.

In the Schenectady area we rowed by several rowing clubs including Shenedehowa Crew Club, Niskayuna Rowing, Burnt Hills Rowing, Mohawk Rowing and Aqueduct Rowing Club. GWC rower, Taz Zavery and former GWC coxswain Dan Knorr both started their rowing careers at Shen Crew.

On our way to the the Hudson River we passed through Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve in the Town of Clifton Park. The Park contains a segment of the original Erie Canal towpath and a number of structures from the 1842 enlarged Erie Canal.

We made it to the Hudson River today in the Town of Waterford!! This junction of the Erie Canal and the Hudson River is considered to be the start of the Erie Canal.

We continued on past Peebles Island State Park and the City of Troy. Troy is located on the western edge of Rensselaer County and on the eastern bank of the Hudson River. Prior to the arrival of Dutch settlers in the mid 17th century, it was an area occupied by the Mahican Indian tribe. Troy is home to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institue (RPI) and in the late 1800s was home to rowing shell manufacturer, Waters Paper Boat Factory. These shells were considered to be the first composite boats and were made from a form of papier-mâché. They were popular in the 1870s and sold world-wide.

We passed through Albany, the NYS capitol and ended the day 9 miles in the Town of Schodack.

Max Meters of the Day: Jen Colby – 15,786

Milestones:
Over 40,000 meters Reached:
Tom Kosanke
JB

Over 25,000 meters reached:
Jen Colby
Mary Clark
Tamara Abbott
Jim Reynolds

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Jen Colby – 15,786
Tamara Abbott – 11,076
Betsy Nitsche – 10,313
George Morgan – 10,803
Mary Clark – 10,220

5k or more for the day:
Patrick Trudeau – 8,035
Jen Brayer – 7,519 (late add, completed on Day 4)
JB – 6,648
Lisa Norwood – 6,425
Tom Kosanke – 6,266
Jim Reynolds – 6,026
Esther Tanzman – 5,494 (late add, completed on Day 4)

Day 6 - Schodack South Through Kingston to Staatsburg

Our crew now stands at 18 members. Welcome to the crew Dennis Fronheiser! We are happy to have you on board!

As of this morning, we are still 39th out of 441 teams competing in the challenge! We are also still 9th among teams with 6-20 members. Not bad considering only 7 of our crew members logged meters yesterday. To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings

The deadline to join the Challenge is January 16th and we’d love to have you join the team, if you haven’t already. If you are interested in, we strongly encourage you to join ASAP so your meters can be added to the totals. If you have not joined by Sunday, January 8th you will be removed from this email (unless you send me a note saying you want to be kept on it).

For Day 6, our 7 rowers (lowest participation thus far) completed a total of 77,731 meters (48.3 miles). We now stand at 534,852 total meters (332.3 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day 9 miles southeast of Albany in the Town of Shodack. Continuing down the Hudson we rowed through the Hudson Valley passing through Coxsackie, Germantown, Saugerties, Rhinebeck, Kingston and finishing the day in Staatsburg.

The Hudson River is 315-mile (507 km) long and flows north to south primarily through eastern New York. It originates in the Adirondack Mountains, flows through the Hudson Valley, and eventually drains into the Atlantic Ocean, between New York City and Jersey City. The river is named after Henry Hudson, an Englishman who sailed for the Dutch East India Company, and explored the river in 1609. Canada’s Hudson Bay is also named after Henry Hudson. We are traveling what is known as the Lower Hudson. The lower Hudson is actually a tidal estuary, with tidal influence extending as far as the Federal Dam in Troy.

Max Meters of the Day: Francesca Scumaci – 20,000 (wow!! Not bad for a Coxswain!)

Milestones:
Over 40,000 meters Reached:
Tamara Abbott
Mary Clark

Over 25,000 meters reached:
Betsy Nitsche

Shout outs:
20k+ for the day (had to create a new category for Francesca!)
Francesca Scumaci – 20k

10k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 15,233
Jim Reynolds – 10,589
Betsy Nitsche – 10,086

5k or more for the day:
Mary Clark – 7580
Dennis Fronheiser – 5,417

Day 7 - Through Manhatten to Harlem!

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 7 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

Our crew now stands at 20 members. Welcome to the crew Anita Piccaretta and Andrew Woodward!! We are happy to have you on board!

If you are not a crew member, today is the last day you’ll receive this report (unless you send me a note saying you want to keep getting it). You will still be able to access our log either on the Genesee Waterways Center Facebook Page or the GWC website.  If you’ve been on the fence, hop off and join the team! We’d love to have you on board!

The main goal of this challenge is to have fun and build community spirit. Goal number two is to provide motivation to hop on an erg and work on our fitness during the long, cold month of January. The third goal is building competitive spirit by competing against other teams around the world.

As of this morning, we have moved up to 36th place in the overall team standings! Our best standing so far! Let’s keep up the good work! To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings on the Concept 2 website.

For Day 7, 15 rowers completed a total of 127,883 meters (79.5 miles). We now stand at 670,769 total meters (416.8 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day in Staatsburg and passed by a lot of interesting places, including several hiking opportunities (clickable links for more info provided).

Black Creek State Forest – 595-acres, is part of a network of public and private conservation lands surrounding the John Burroughs Nature Sanctuary along Black Creek, a tributary of the Hudson River. Open year-round. Recreation activities include fishing, primitive camping, hiking, paddling, hunting, snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, mountain biking, snowmobiling and horseback riding

Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National Historic Site – FDR was the 35th president of the US. His Springwood estate in Hyde Park was designated a National Historic Site in 1945. Springwood was FDR’s birthplace, lifelong home, and burial place.

Culinary Institute of America – This is the main branch of the Culinary Institute of America. It is a private, not-for profit college specializing in culinary and baking arts. In addition to professional education, the college also offers recreational classes for non-professionals. The college operates student-run restaurants on their four U.S. campuses.

Poughkeepsie – from 1895 to 1949 the Poughkeepsie Regatta was the annual championship regatta of the U.S. Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) . The very first IRA race was held in June 1895, with one Varsity Eight team from Cornell, Columbia and Pennsylvania competing. The straight four mile course was run as a head-to-head race. Over time, the race grew to include the Varsity four mile race, a three-mile JV race and a two-mile freshman race. Eastern schools dominated the regatta in the early years. In 1923 the University of Washington became the first Western crew to win the Poughkeepsie Regatta. From that year on the Western schools that participated, namely the University of Washington and the University of California, became a dominating factor. In 1936, the UW crews (including the Varsity 8 of Boys in the Boat fame), swept all three events.

Splashdown Beach – For those of you who enjoy waterparks, Splashdown Beach in Fishkill, NY is a good place to stop, especially if you have kids.

Newburgh – is considered a part of the New York metropolitan area. The area was first settled in the early 18th century by the Germans and British. During the American Revolution, Newburgh served as the headquarters of the Continental Army. The Newburgh Rowing Club is home to America Rows – Newburgh, an affiliate of US Rowing’s America Rows inclusion program.

Dia:Beacon, Riggio Galleries is the museum for the Dia Art Foundation’s collection of art from the 1960s to the present. The museum, which opened in 2003, is situated on the banks of the Hudson River in Beacon, New York.

Hudson Highlands State Park Preserve is a mostly undeveloped preserve of nearly 6,000 acres. It stretches from Annsville Creek in Peekskill, north to Dennings Point in Beacon. It is perfect for fishing, boating, hiking, and birding. The park’s extensive hiking trail network includes terrain that varies from easy to challenging. The park’s most well known trail – Breakneck Ridge was rated by Newsweek as one of the top 10 day hikes in America. The 5.5 mile Breakneck Ridge trail rises 1,250 feet in only a ¾ mile stretch.

Storm King State Park is an undeveloped park offering day hikes that include spectacular views of the Catskills and the Hudson Valley.

West Point is the oldest continuously occupied military post in the United States. It was established in 1775 by George Washington who considered it the most important strategic position in America. It comprises approximately 16,000 acres (6,500 ha) including the campus of the United States Military Academy at West Point, a four-year coeducational federal service academy. West Point is very difficult to get into. Candidates for admission must both apply directly to the academy and receive a nomination, usually from a member of Congress, Delegate/Resident Commissioner, President or Vice President of the United States. The academic program grants a bachelor of science degree with a curriculum that grades cadets’ performance upon a broad academic program, military leadership performance, and mandatory participation in competitive athletics (such as rowing).

Fort Montgomery State Historic Site – Fort Montgomery was the scene of a fierce Revolutionary War battle for control of the Hudson River. Visitors today can tour the remains of the 14-acre fortification, perched on a cliff overlooking the magnificent Hudson.

Bear Mountain State Park is situated in rugged mountains rising from the west bank of the Hudson River. The park features a large play field, shaded picnic groves, lake and river fishing access, a swimming pool, Trailside Museums and Zoo, hiking, biking and cross-country ski trails and an outdoor ice rink is. The Perkins Memorial Tower atop Bear Mountain affords spectacular views of the park, the Hudson Highlands and Harriman State Park.

The City of Peekskill, is located in the New York City metropolitan area. It is situated on a bay along the east side of the Hudson River, across from Jones Point. This community was known to be an early American industrial center, primarily for its iron plow and stove products. The Binney & Smith Company, makers of Crayola products, started as the Peekskill Chemical Company in 1864. Peekskill’s manufacturing base operated well into the late 20th century, with the Fleischmann Company making yeast by-products under the Standard Brands corporate name.
Blue Mountain Reservation is a 1,538-acre park in the northwest section of Westchester County. It was acquired in 1926. It features miles of trails for mountain biking, strolling and nature study, and offers challenging hikes to the tops of two large peaks, Mt. Spitzenberg and Blue Mountain.
Nyack is one of five southeastern Rockland County villages and hamlets that constitute “The Nyacks” – Nyack, Central Nyack, South Nyack, Upper Nyack and West Nyack. Named after the Native Americans who resided there before European colonization, the village is located on the hilly terrain that meets the western shore of the Hudson River. Adjacent South Nyack is the western terminus of the Tappan Zee Bridge, connected across the Hudson River to Tarrytown in Westchester County by U.S. Interstate 87.
Sleepy Hollow is a village in the town of Mount Pleasant. The village is known to many via “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”, a short story about the local area and its infamous specter, the Headless Horseman, written by Washington Irving, who lived in Tarrytown and is buried in Sleepy Hollow Cemetery. Owing to this story, as well as the village’s roots in American history and folklore, Sleepy Hollow is considered by some to be one of the “most haunted places in the world”.
Yonkers is the fourth most populous city in the U.S. state of New York (behind New York City, Buffalo, and Rochester), and the most populous city in Westchester County. It is an inner suburb of New York City, directly to the north of the Bronx and approximately two miles north of the northernmost point in Manhattan.

We passed under the George Washington Bridge, a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River between the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City and Fort Lee, New Jersey. We also passed through The Bronx and Yankee Stadium, Upper Manhattan and finished the day in Harlem.

Max Meters of the Day: Jim Reynolds – 20,287 meters!!

Milestones:
Over 40,000 meters Reached:
Jim Reynolds
Paul Ipolito
Jen Colby
George Morgan

Over 25,000 meters reached:
Jen Brayer
Francesca Scumaci (too close to not list at 24,921 meters)

Shout outs:
20k+ for the day
Jim Reynolds – 20,287 meters

10k+ for the day
JB – 10,518
Paul Ipolito – 10,190

5k or more for the day:
Jen Brayer – 9,111
Betsy Nitsche – 9,084
Jen Colby – 9,064
George Morgan – 8,987
Tamara Abbott – 8,840
Jen Hayes – 8,426
Andrew Woodward – 6,028
Esther Tanzman – 5,100

If you want to join the challenge, go to Genesee Waterways JVTC page for more information and instructions on how to join, log meters, etc.

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Week 1- Progress Map

GWC Rowing Rochester NY team challenge

A Map of Our First Week’s Progress!

Second Week’s Progress

Day 8 - Harlem to Bay Head, NJ

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 8 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. 

Our crew now stands at 21 members. Welcome to the crew Taz Zavery!! We are happy to have you on board and will be even happier when you start logging some meters! 

As of this morning, we are 38th place in the overall team standings! Let’s keep up the good work! To view the complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings 

For Day 8, 11 rowers completed a total of 124,271 meters (77.2 miles). We now stand at 670,769 total meters (494 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day in Harlem. WOW! so much to see in New York City! We pass through Manhatten, Row by Central Park  and the Hell’s Kitchen neighborhood in Manhattan. Hell’s Kitchen is located close to the Broadway Theaters and Actors Studio and has been home to learning and practicing actors for a long time. It got it’s name because it was populated by mostly poor and working class Irish Americans. It had a gritty reputation that kept real estate prices down for quite awhile. Since the early 1990s, the area has seen a lot of improvement and rents have risen rapidly.

Other places of interest we passed in the New York City area include: the Empire State Building, The Whitney Museum of American History, the World Trade Center, and the NY Stock Exchange. We left the Hudson river and entered the Upper New York Bay passing Staten Island on our starboard side and Long Island on our port. We also passed Liberty State Park, Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty National Monument. We had to watch out for container and cruise ships as we rowed past Port Jersey. Talk about feeling like the smallest fish in the pond!

After passing Fort Hamilton, we entered the Lower New York Bay. We rowed through Rarity Bay and Sandy Hook Bay. We had to go around Sandy Hook because it is a barrier spit, not an island, and is connected to the mainland at one end. We continued our journey following the Jersey shoreline. The Jersey Shore area is a popular vacation destination and includes MiddlesexMonmouthAtlantic County, Cape May, and Ocean counties. We ended the day at Bay Head, NJ.

Max Meters of the Day: Mary Clark – 20,632 meters!!

Milestones:
Over 60,000 meters reached:
Tamara Abbott
Jim Reynolds
Mary Clark
JB
George Morgan
Paul Ipolito

Over 40,000 meters Reached:
Jen Brayer

Shout outs:
20k+ for the day
Mary Clark – 20,632 meters

10k+ for the day
Paul Ipolito – 12,320
George Morgan – 12,081
Tamara Abbott – 11,718
Jen Brayer – 10,976
Jen Colby – 10,605

5k or more for the day:
Lisa Norwood – 7,716
Andrew Woodward – 5,140
JB – 5,000

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 9 - Still off the Jersey Shore

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

We have now passed the half-million meter mark! Here is the Day 9 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. 

As of this morning, we have fallen back a bit to 41st place in the overall team standings, but we only had 6 crew members put in meters yesterday. Rest days can be good for us, but to make progress in our speed, we should be working out 5-6 days per week. Those workouts can be cross-training – xcountry skiing, swimming, spin class, strength training, etc. Cross training can help make winter less monotonous and help reduce the chance of repetitive use injuries. The main thing is to progressively provide a higher stimulus. Another words… Don’t increase work volume and/or intensity too quickly. NO WEEKEND WARRIORS!! Increases should be made incrementally and based on the fitness level you are starting from. For complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings 

Our 6 rowers completed a total of 58,726 meters (36.5 miles). We now stand at 670,769 total meters (530.6 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day in Bay Head, NJ on the Jersey Shore traveling The Barnegat Peninsula, also known as the Island Beach Peninsula or Barnegat Bay Island and colloquially as “the barrier island”. It is a 20-mile (32 km) long, narrow barrier peninsula dividing Barnegat Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. It is a popular summer vacation destination and is heavily dependent on tourismreal estate and fishing. We almost made it to the end of the peninsula and finished the day in Beach Haven. Beach Haven is home to multiple attractions, including the only amusement park on the island: Fantasy Island, the Long Beach Island Museum and many distinctive shops and restaurants, including Tucker’s Restaurant, noted in Philadelphia magazine as the number one restaurant on Long Beach Island. In 1916, a series of shark attacks took place along the Jersey Shore. with the first incident occurring in Long Beach. The series of attacks became the basis for the book and movie Jaws by Peter Benchley. When Hurricane Sandy hit in October 2012, two Pavilions were washed away and subsequently rebuilt in June 2013. To see a full map of our voyage, go to GWC Virtual Challenge Voyage Map

Max Meters of the Day: Tamara Abbott – 15,010 meters!!

Milestones:
Over 80,000 meters reached:
Tamara Abbott

Over 60,000 meters Reached:
Jen Colby

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 15,010
Jen Colby – 11,979
Patricia Rozzo – 10,542 (Glad to have you back on board, Patricia!)

5k or more for the day:
Francesca Scumaci – 6k
Esther Tanzman – 5k

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 10 - Beach Haven, NJ to Rehoboth Bay, Delaware

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 10 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

As of this morning, we moved back up one place to 40th in the overall team standings.

Nine rowers completed a total of 128,077 meters (79.6 miles). We now stand at 981,981 total meters (610.2 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day in Beach Haven, NJ on the Jersey Shore, continued along the coast, crossed the Delaware Bay and into Delaware. We finished the day at the Delaware Seashore State Park to camp overnight. To see a full map of our voyage, go to GWC Virtual Challenge Voyage Map

Places of Interest
• Jacques Cousteau National Estuarine Research Reserve, which encompasses over 110,000 acres of terrestrial, wetland and aquatic habitats within the Mullica River-Great Bay Ecosystem. This area is one of the least disturbed estuaries in the densely populated urban corridor of the northeastern United States. Estuaries, where rivers meet the sea, are the wide lower course of a river where its current is met by the tides. This mix of fresh and salt water creates a unique and very productive ecosystem vital to life both on land and in the sea.

North Brigantine Natural Area boasts a rarity along New Jersey’s Atlantic coast: approximately 2.5 miles of undeveloped beach. Located between the city of Brigantine and Brigantine Inlet, the site is composed of primary to mature dunes, maritime forest and tidal marsh. The site has been designated as a Natural Heritage Priority Site by New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

Atlantic City is a resort city on New Jersey’s Atlantic coast that’s known for its many casinos, wide beaches and iconic Boardwalk. Established in the 1800s as a health resort, today the city is dotted with glitzy high-rise hotels and nightclubs.

Cape May Peninsula resides in Cape May County and runs southward from the New Jersey mainland, separating Delaware Bay from the Atlantic Ocean. The city of Cape May is the home of the oldest seaside resort in America, dating back to the 18th century. The entire city was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1976, and many of the buildings throughout the town are original Victorian structures that have been maintained and are in pristine condition. Cape May is also famous as one of the top birding sites in North America. It is also the only enlisted basic training center for the United States Coast Guard in the country.

Delaware Seashore State Park covers 2,825 acres and is bounded on the east by the Atlantic Ocean and on the west by Rehoboth Bay and Indian River Bay. It is a major attraction for millions of visitors who come to the Delaware Beaches for water-related activities and offers both tent and RV camping.

Max Meters of the Day: Tamara Abbott – 19,204 meters!!

Milestones:
Over 100,000 meters reached:
Tamara Abbott

Over 80,000 meters Reached:
Jen Colby

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 19,204
George Morgan – 15,825

10k+ for the day:
Jen Colby – 14,742
Jen Brayer – 13,945
Taz Zavery – 3,554
Jen Hayes – 13,234
Betsy Nitsche – 10,333

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 11 - Departing Delaware and into Maryland

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 11 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

We’ve collectively rowed over one million meters so far! Nice work everyone, let’s keep it going!

We’re almost to the middle of the challenge. Teams are starting to lose focus. This is the point in any race where the going gets tough. Focus on one stoke at a time, one workout at a time, one day at a time. Enjoy the journey.

As of this morning, we are in 41st place in the overall team standings. 12 rowers completed a total of 102,011 meters (79.6 miles). We now stand at 1,083,992 total meters (673.6 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day at the Delaware Seashore State Park and after 15 miles crossed from the waters of Delaware to Maryland, just off the coast of Ocean City. We then travel along Assateagua Island and into the coastal waters of Virginia. We finish the day near Metompkin Inlet. To see a full map of our voyage, go to GWC Virtual Challenge Voyage Map

Places of Interest
Ocean City is a resort town in the state of Maryland between the Atlantic Ocean and Isle of Wight Bay. It features miles of beach and a wooden boardwalk lined with restaurants, shops and hotels. The surrounding waters are active with kayaks and tour boats.

Assateagua Island is a 37-mile long barrier island located off the eastern coast of Delmarva. The northern two-thirds of the island is in Maryland while the southern third is in Virginia. The Maryland section contains the majority of Assateague Island National Seashore and Assateague State Park. The Virginia section contains Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and a one-mile stretch of land containing a lifeguarded recreational beach and interpretive facilities managed by the National Park Service. It is best known for its herds of feral horses, pristine beaches, and the Assateague Lighthouse.

Wallops Island is primarily used for NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, including the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, a commercial space launch facility. The Wallops Island National Wildlife Refuge is also located on the island.

Metompkin Island is just one of a string of barrier islands that protect the Eastern Shore from the Atlantic. This part of Virginia contains the longest expanse of coastal wilderness remaining on the east coast. Most of the islands, marshes and tidal flats are owned by the Nature Conservancy as part of their Virginia Coast Reserve. Other parts of this ecosystem are owned by the Commonwealth of Virginia, or are federally protected.

Max Meters of the Day: Jim Reynolds – 15.447 meters!!

All Meters are Good Meters: Anita Piccarretta – 1,790

Milestones:
Over 80k Reached:
Jim Reynolds – 92,529
George Morgan – 87,879

Over 60k Reached:
Jen Brayer

Over 20k Reached:
Esther Tanzman

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Jim Reynolds – 92,529

10k+ for the day:
Tamara Abbott – 12,706
George Morgan – 11,613
JB – 11,220

5k+ for the day
Betsy Nitsche – 8,579
Pat Trudeau – 7,654
Jen Colby – 7,057
Jen Brayer – 6,844
Esther Tanzman – 6,100
Patricia Rozzo – 5,664

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 12 - Delaware, past Maryland and into Virginia!

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 11 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

We’ve collectively rowed over one million meters so far! Nice work everyone, let’s keep it going!

We’re almost to the middle of the challenge. Teams are starting to lose focus. This is the point in any race where the going gets tough. Focus on one stroke at a time, one workout at a time, one day at a time. Enjoy the journey.

12 rowers completed a total of 102,011 meters (79.6 miles). We now stand at 1,083,992 total meters (673.6 miles) for the challenge! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day at the Delaware Seashore State Park and after 15 miles crossed from the waters of Delaware to Maryland, just off the coast of Ocean City. We then travel along Assateagua Island and into the coastal waters of Virginia. We finish the day near Metompkin Inlet.

Places of Interest
Ocean City is a resort town in the state of Maryland between the Atlantic Ocean and Isle of Wight Bay. It features miles of beach and a wooden boardwalk lined with restaurants, shops and hotels. The surrounding waters are active with kayaks and tour boats.

Assateagua Island is a 37-mile long barrier island located off the eastern coast of Delmarva. The northern two-thirds of the island is in Maryland while the southern third is in Virginia. The Maryland section contains the majority of Assateague Island National Seashore and Assateague State Park. The Virginia section contains Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and a one-mile stretch of land containing a lifeguarded recreational beach and interpretive facilities managed by the National Park Service. It is best known for its herds of feral horses, pristine beaches, and the Assateague Lighthouse.

Wallops Island is primarily used for NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility, including the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport, a commercial space launch facility. The Wallops Island National Wildlife Refuge is also located on the island.

Metompkin Island is just one of a string of barrier islands that protect the Eastern Shore from the Atlantic. This part of Virginia contains the longest expanse of coastal wilderness remaining on the east coast. Most of the islands, marshes and tidal flats are owned by the Nature Conservancy as part of their Virginia Coast Reserve. Other parts of this ecosystem are owned by the Commonwealth of Virginia, or are federally protected.

Max Meters of the Day: Jim Reynolds – 15.447 meters!!

All Meters are Good Meters – Anita Piccarretta – 1,790

Milestones:
Over 80k Reached:
Jim Reynolds – 92,529
George Morgan – 91,879

Over 60k Reached
Jen Brayer

Over 20k Reached
Esther Tanzman

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Jim Reynolds – 92,529

10k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 12,706
George Morgan – 11,613
JB – 11,220

5k+ for the day
Betsy Nitsche – 8,579
Pat Trudeau – 7,654
Jen Colby – 7,057
Jen Brayer – 6,844
Esther Tanzman – 6,100
Patricia Rozzo – 5,664

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 13 - Past the Chesapeake Bay to Virginia’s Barrier Islands

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is Friday the 13th captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

As of this morning, we have continued to drop in the stands and are now in 45th place. Let’s get a good push this weekend to try to climb back up.

Six rowers erged yesterday for a total of 47,527 meters (29.5 miles). We now stand at 1,206,180 total meters (749.5 miles) for the challenge!

If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day at Adam’s Island, continued along Virginia’s barrier islands, crossed Chesapeake Bay, passed Virginia Beach and ended the day at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

Places of Interest:
Chesapeake Bay is an estuary lying inland from the Atlantic Ocean, and surrounded by the mainland to the west, and the Delmarva Peninsula to the east. It is the largest such body in the contiguous United States. The northern bay is within Maryland, the southern portion within Virginia,. More than 150 major rivers and streams flow into the bay. The bay is The bay is spanned in Maryland by the Chesapeake Bay Bridge and in Virginia by the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel connecting Cape Charles to Virginia Beach.

Virginia Beach is a resort city with miles of beaches and hundreds of hotels, motels, and restaurants along its oceanfront. Every year the city hosts the East Coast Surfing Championships as well as the North American Sand Soccer Championship. It is also home to several state parks, several long-protected beach areas, three military bases, a number of large corporations, two universities.

Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge is part of Virginia’s Outer Banks. The refuge’s barrier islands feature large sand dunes, maritime forests, fresh water marshes, ponds, ocean beach, and large impoundments for wintering birds. The majority of refuge marshlands are on islands contained within the waters of Back Bay. It is considered by conservationists to be an important link along the Atlantic Flyway for migratory birds such as snow geese.

Max Meters of the Day: Jim Reynolds- 11,582 meters

Milestones:
Over 125k Reached:
Tamara Abbott – 125,580

Over 100k Reached:
Jim Reynolds – 104,111

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Jim Reynolds – 11,582
Tamara Abbott – 10,001

5k+ for the day
JB – 6,560
Jen Colby – 5,568

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 14 - Virginia to the Outer Banks of North Carolina

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 14  captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

WOW! Day 13th’s rest day paid off! Nice push yesterday crew! We moved up 2 places to 43rd out of 547 teams! For complete standings for the Challenge go to JVTC Standings

We are now up to a crew of 23 rowers for the challenge. Welcome to the team Pat Berhard!

Fourteen rowers erged yesterday for a total of 169,032 meters (105 miles). We now stand at 1,375,212 total meters (855.5 miles) for the challenge!

If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day at Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia. We passed by False Cape State Park and then entered the waters of North Carolina at Currituck National Wildlife Refuge. We spent the day along North Carolina’s Outer Banks, a 200-mile-long (320 km) string of narrow peninsulas and barrier islands. The Outer Banks cover most of the North Carolina coastline, separating the Currituck Sound, Albemarle Sound, and Pamlico Sound from the Atlantic Ocean. They are a major tourist destination and are known around the world for their subtropical climate and wide expanse of open beachfront. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore has four campgrounds. The treacherous seas off the Outer Banks and the large number of shipwrecks that have occurred there have given these seas the nickname Graveyard of the Atlantic, and the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum is located in Hatteras Village near the United States Coast Guard facility and Hatteras ferry. We entered Pamlico Sound at Oregon Inlet for respite from the ocean waves and traveled along the mainland. We ended the day at Gull Rock Gameland.

Places of Interest:
False Cape, VA was so named because from the ocean it could be easily mistaken for Cape Henry, which lies about 20 miles (32 km) to the north at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay. This false impression lured ships and boats looking for Cape Henry into the shallow waters, where they could easily run aground. False Cape State Park includes hiking and biking trails, a visitors’ center, extensive environmental educational programs, and primitive camping. The park can be accessed on foot, bicycle, or a seasonally available tram through Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Boat access is possible from any shoreline.

The Kitty Hawk Woods Reserve is a large parcel of maritime forest, marshes, and brackish swamplands that border the Currituck Sound. The Kitty Hawk Woods Reserve is a cluster of barrier islands as well as small, marshy islands that lay just off the soundside beaches. Hiking, birding, fishing and hunting are all popular past times, however it is an especially attractive destination for kayakers, stand up paddle boarders, and windsurfers who can cruise the waters and enjoy unparalleled and private wildlife watching, and incredible sunsets.

Wright Brothers National Memorial, located in Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, commemorates the first successful, sustained, powered flights from 1900 to 1903. Wilbur and Orville Wright chose this location because of the area’s steady winds.

Cape Hatteras National Seashore is a preserve that is over 70 miles (110 km) extending from Bodie Island to Ocracoke Island, stretching. Cape Hatteras has a wealth of history relating to shipwrecks, lighthouses, and the US Lifesaving Service. The islands provide a variety of habitats and wintering area for migrating waterfowl. The park’s fishing and surfing are considered the best on the East Coast.

Oregon Inlet was formed when a hurricane lashed the Outer Banks in 1846, separating Bodie Island from Pea Island. It was named after The Oregon, a ship that managed to ride out the storm. Oregon Inlet is one of the few access points to the ocean along this stretch of coast. It is a major departure point for charter fishing trips and a nearby harbor serves as a base for many large boats that travel miles out towards the Gulf Stream.

Gull Rock Gameland encompasses 19,436 acres and includes wetland habitats, brackish marshes, low and high pocosin bogs  bald cypress stands, pine woodlands, and hardwood forested flats. It is home to more than sixty species of birds. Deer, raccoons, and otters are the most frequently seen mammals, but there are also alligators and black bears present.

Max Meters of the Day: Jim Reynolds- 24,324 meters

Milestones:
Over 125k Reached:
Jim Reynolds – 128,435

Over 100k Reached:
George Morgan – 108,774

Over 80k Reached:
Paul Ipolito – 87,018
JB – 86,189

Over 50k Reached
Tom Kosanke – 55,270

Shout outs:
Half-marathon (21,097 m) +
Jim Reynolds – 24,324

15k+ for the day
Paul Ipolito – 16,696

10k+ for the day
Jen Brayer – 13,385
Jen Colby – 12,828
George Morgan – 12,247
Tom Kosanke – 11,534
Nancy Harter – 10.624

5k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 9,492
Jen Hayes – 8,742
JB – 7,162
Pat Bernhard – 6,279
Anita Piccarretta – 5,851
Andrew Woodward – 5,104

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Week 2 – Progress Map

Second-Week-GWC-Team-Challenge-Progress

A Progress Map of GWC’s Second Week!

Third Week’s Progress

Day 15 - Gull Rock Gameland, NC to Mallshallberg, NC

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 15  captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

We held our place at 43rd out of 547 teams yesterday. Six rowers erged yesterday for a total of 81,048 meters (50.4 miles). We now stand at 1,467,079 total meters (911.6 miles) for the challenge!

If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day at Gull Rock Gameland in North Carolina and continued our journey through Pamlico Sound and crossed to Cedar Island and Cedar Island National Wildlife Refuge. We entered Core Sound, rowed along Cape Lookout Seashore and finished the day near Marshallberg.

Max Meters of the Day: Jen Brayer- 18,125 meters

Milestones:
Over 80k Reached:
Jen Brayer – 93,890

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Jen Brayer – 18,125
Tom Kosanke – 15,372

10k+ for the day
Lisa Norwood – 10,810
Paul Ipolito – 10,300

5k+ for the day
JB – 9,028
Jim Reynolds – 6,015

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 16 - Marshallberg, NC to Camp Lejeune, NC (a US Marines training station)

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 16  captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

As pf this morning we are still 43rd out of 563 teams. All crews and teams are now final and no additional crew members can be added to teams and no more teams can be added to the challenge.

Nine rowers erged yesterday for a total of 80,722 meters (50.2 miles). We now stand at 1,547,801 total meters (961.8 miles) for the challenge!

If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total. On that note, a reminder… Please be sure to log your meters EVERY DAY that you erg by midnight so we have accurate daily totals.

We started the day at Marshallberg, NC and at Harkers Island headed into Back Sound. We rowed past Cape Lookout National Seashore and entered the area known as the Crystal Coast. We cruised by Shackleford Banks on our port side and the Rachel Carson Estuarine Reserve on starboard. We headed into Bogue Sound which separates Bogue Banks, a 21-mile long barrier island, from the mainland. We had to plan our route through the sound carefully because around the time of World War II, the sound was used by airplanes for test bombing. There are signs along the way warning of unexploded ordnance. From Bogue Sound we pass into Banks Channel, weaving our way through many small islands. We pass Hammock’s Beach State Park and head into Onslow Bay. Our layover is at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC.

Places of Interest:
Shackleford Banks is a barrier island system on the coast of Carteret County, North Carolina. It contains a herd of feral horses, scallops, crabs and various sea animals. It is also a Loggerhead Turtle nesting ground. It is a tourist destination and has beach camping sites.

Rachel Carson Estuarine Reserve – The islands and estuarine waters of the Rachel Carson Reserve are strongly influenced by river and inlet dynamics and the twice-daily tides. The resulting mix of fresh and salt water creates a pristine estuarine environment where juvenile fish and invertebrates find shelter and food. Diverse arrays of important coastal habitats are found at the site including: tidal flats, salt marshes, ocean beach, soft bottom, shell bottom, dredge spoil areas, sand dunes, shrub thicket, submerged aquatic vegetation, and maritime forest.

Beaufort is the third-oldest town in North Carolina and was ranked as “America’s Coolest Small Town” by readers of Budget Travel Magazine. It is often confused with Beaufort, SC. In June 1718 Blackbekard the pirate ran his flagship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge and his sloop Adventure, aground near present-day Beaufort Inlet.

Morehead City – In addition to a thriving sport fishing industry, Morehead City and surrounding areas are a popular scuba diving destination. It sits comfortably between a number of famous wrecks, including the German submarine U-352 in the area known as The Graveyard of the Atlantic.

Camp Lejeune is a 246-square-mile Marine Corps military training facility in Jacksonville, North Carolina. The base’s 14 miles (23 km) of beaches make it a major area for amphibious assault training, and its location between two deep-water ports (Wilmington and Morehead City) allows for fast deployments.

Max Meters of the Day: Jen Colby – 16,801 meters

Milestones:
Over 125k Reached;
Jen Colby – 137,643

Over 100k Reached:
JB – 104,269

Over 75k Reached:
Tom Kosanke – 80,642

Over 25k Reached:
Esther Tanzman

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Jen Colby – 16,801
Francesca Scumaci – 12,345

10k+ for the day
Tom Kosanke – 10,000
Paul Ipolito – 10,300

5k+ for the day
JB – 9,052
Tamara Abbott – 6,419
Esther Tanzman – 6,100

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Days 17 & 18 - Camp Lejeune, NC to Pawley’s Island, SC

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 17 & 18 combined captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Sorry Crew… Got a little behind yesterday!

As of this morning we moved up one place to 42nd out of 563 teams. All crews and teams are now final and no additional crew members can be added to teams and no more teams can be added to the challenge.

Eleven rowers erged on Tuesday for a total of 121,053 meters (75.2 miles). On Wednesday, we erged 115,730 meters (71.9 miles). We now stand at 1,770,023 total meters (1,099.8 miles) for the challenge!

REMINDER… PLEASE REMEMBER TO LOG YOUR METERS IN YOUR CONCEPT 2 LOGBOOK EVERY DAY YOU ERG! If you erged yesterday but didn’t get your meters logged, be sure to (1) Log your meters! (2) Email me (karen@geneseewaterways.org) and let me know your total.

We started day 17 at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, NC. We continued our travels along the beaches and vacation destinations of North Carolina, including, Topsail Beach, Surf City, Figure 8 Island, Masonboro Island, Carolina Beach, Kure Beach and we finished the day at Bald Head Island. On day 18 we continued following the North Carolina coastline passing Oak Island, Holden Beach, Ocean Isle Beach and Bird Island. We entered South Carolina waters at Little River and followed the shoreline past the popular Spring vacation destinations of North Myrtle Beach and Myrtle Beach. We rowed by Surfside Beach, Murrell’s Inlet, Litchfield by the Sea and ended day 18 at Pawley’s Island.

Places of Interest:
Topsail Beach  – Local folklore claims the name, Topsail (pronounced Tops’l), originated during the 1700s when pirate ships roamed the coastal waters. Historians explain that marauding pirates hid their ships in the channel behind the island and waited for passing merchant ships loaded with goods. The pirates would pursue and attack the merchants, claiming the cargoes as their own. Eventually the merchants became aware of this infamous hiding place and began to watch for the tops of the pirates’ sails showing over the rolling dunes – hence the name Topsail Island.

Figure Eight Island is a barrier island that is known for being an affluent summer colony of the American Southeast. The island is surrounded by the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean. It is a private island that can only be reached via a guarded causeway swing bridget. The island has been known as a popular destination for wealthy North Carolinians as well as celebrities and politicians including former Vice President Al Gore and Senator John Edwards, who owns a house on the island.

Masonboro Island is undeveloped and accessible only by boat. It is a component of the North Carolina National Estuarine Research Reserve and a North Carolina State Natural Area.

Bald Head Island, historically Smith Island, is a village located on the east side of the Cape Fear River. It is small, somewhat remote and only accessible by ferry from the nearby town of Southport. There are few cars on the island and instead, residents drive modified electric golf carts. Bald Head Island is nationally recognized for its sea turtle nesting activity.

Oak Island has been inhabited since the early 19th century; Fort Caswell was built on its eastern end in 1838. The island was nearly wiped out by Hurricane Hazel in 1954, Diana in 1984, Bertha and Fran in 1996 and Floyd in 1999. In June 2015, two separate shark attacks occurred two miles and two hours apart from each other on the beachfront south side of the town. Both victims lost an arm and were in critical condition, but were quickly stabilized due to fast civilian and rescue responses. This does not sound like a good area to flip a rowing shell!

Myrtle Beach is situated on the center of a large and continuous stretch of beach known as the Grand Strand in northeastern South Carolina. It is a major center of tourism in the United States because of the city’s warm subtropical climate and extensive beaches. It attracts an estimated 14 million visitors each year.

Max Meters of Day 17: Francesca Scumaci – 12,342 meters
Max Meters of Day 18: Pat Trudeau – 26,122

Milestones:
Over 150K Reached
Jen Colby – 162,293
Tamara Abbott – 153,249

Over 100k Reached:
Paul Ipolito – 109,115
Jen Brayer – 107,879

Over 75k Reached:
Betsy Nitschke – 82,642

Over 50k Reached:
Francesca Scumaci – 55,608

Over 25k Reached:
Nancy Harter – 32,818
Pat Trudeau – 41,811

Shout outs:
10k+ for days 17 & 18
Francesca Scumaci – 12,342/13,753
Jen Colby – 11,376/13,753
Betsy Nitschke – 10,122/14,875

10k+ for day 17
Paul Ipolito – 11,960
Tamara Abbott – 11,758
Jen Brayer – 11,741
Taz Zavery – 11,702
Jen Hayes – 10,040

10k+ for day 18
George Morgan – 10,770

5k+ for day 17
Nancy Harter – 8,242
Jim Reynolds – 8,242

5k+ for day 18
Paul Ipolito – 8,710
Esther Tanzman – 7,915
Tom Kosanke – 5,000

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 19 - Pawley’s Island, SC to Bulls Island, SC

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 19 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

As of this morning we are still 42nd out of 563 teams. Eleven rowers erged on Thursday for a total of 104,515 meters (64.9 miles). We now stand at 1,889,099 total meters (1,173.8 miles) for the challenge!

We started Day 19 at Pawley’s Island, SC. Hugging the coast we passed Several Wildlife Reserves including Winyah Bay National Estuarine  Baruch-North Island Reserve, Tom Yawkee Wildlife Center  Santee Coastal Reserve and Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. In Muddy Bay we passed Lighthouse Island on our starboard side and Cape Romain on our port. We finished the day at Bulls Island which is part of the Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge. The Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge is 66,287 acres. The refuge lands and waters encompass water impoundments, creeks and bays, salt marshes and barrier islands. 29,000 acres are designated as Class I Wilderness. Most of the refuge is only accessible by boat.

Max Meters of Day 17: Betsy Nitschke – 15,863 meters

Milestones:
Over 175K Reached
Jen Colby – 176,475

Over 150k Reached:
Jim Reynolds – 153,724

Over 125k Reached:
George Morgan – 127,080

Over 75k Reached:
Francesca Scumaci – 81,147

Over 25k Reached:
Anita Piccarretta – 26,987

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Betsy Nitschke – 15,863

10k+ for the day
Jen Colby – 14,182
Tamara Abbott – 11,998
Francesca Scumaci – 11,786
Jim Reynolds – 11,023
Mary Clark – 10,480

5k+ for the day
Anita Piccarretta – 6,000
Tom Kosanke – 5,400

All meters are Good meters!
George Morgan – 3,154
Taz Zavery – 2,502

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 20 - Bulls Head, SC to Fripp Island, SC

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 20 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

We are continuing to hold at 42nd out of 563 teams. Eight rowers erged a total of 103,256 meters (64.2 miles). We have completed 1,978,139 total meters (1,229.2 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day at at Bulls Island, SC. We rowed through the area of Charleston passing more of the South Carolina barrier islands – Dewees Island, Isle of Palms, Sullivans Island, Morris Island, Folly Island, Kiawah Island, Seabrook Island. We crossed the Asheppoo-Combahee-Edisto Basin, passed Hunting Island and ended the day at Fripp Island.

Places of Interest
Charleston is the oldest and second-largest city in South Carolina. It was founded in 1670 and originally called Charles Town—honoring King Charles II of England.

Fort Sumter National Monument is located on an island in Charleston Harbor and is accessible by ferry. The Battle of Fort Sumter in April 186 was the beginning of the Civil War.

Morris Island was heavily fortified to defend Charleston harbor, with the fortifications centered on Fort Wagner. It was the scene of heavy fighting during the Union Army’s campaign to capture Charleston, and is perhaps best known today as the scene of the ill-fated assault by the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, an African-American regiment. The regiment and this assault, where it suffered over 50% casualties, was immortalized in the film Glory.

Kiawah Island, named after the Kiawah Indians, is located 21 miles southwest of Charleston. It is operated today largely as a gated resort. Kiawah Island is widely hailed as one of the premier golf destinations on the East Coast and features seven award-winning golf courses designed by the likes of Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player, Tom Fazio, and Pete Dye. Kiawah’s 10 miles of beaches, perfectly preserved maritime forests, sand dunes, and marshes make it an ideal vacation destination.

Edisto Beach was originally settled by the Edistow Indians, but was rediscovered by the Spanish in the late 16th century. Thereafter, commerce on the island began to develop. Rice and indigo were the most common crops during the early settlement years. Later, significant cotton plantations were built and flourished. This industry, fueled by rich land owners and slaves, prospered until the Civil War. By the 1920s South Carolina residents began arriving on Edisto Island and Edisto Beach to build crude retreats. In those days, access to the island could be gained only at low tide by driving or riding across the marsh on beds of oyster shells.

The Ashepoo, Combahee and Edisto Basin (abbreviated as ACE Basin) is one of the largest undeveloped estuaries along the Atlantic Coast. Located primarily in Colleton, Charleston and Beaufort counties, the Ashepoo, Combahee and South Edisto rivers combine into the larger St. Helena Sound and drain a significant portion of the Lowcountry region. The area is renowned for its extensive natural beauty and commitment to preserve marshes, wetlands, hardwood forests, and riverine systems and the various fauna that occupy the area.

Hunting Island is a 5,000-acre secluded semitropical barrier island located 15 miles east of Beaufort, South Carolina. Since 1935, it has been classified as a state park. It is the most-visited state park facility in South Carolina and is a part of the ACE Basin estuarine reserve area. Renowned for its natural beauty, the island remains one of the few remaining undeveloped Sea Islands in the Lowcountry. The park is known for its 19th century lighthouse which bears its name.

Fripp Island – Although it has had several names over its history, the island is presently named after Captain Johannes Fripp, a British sailor charged with protecting the Carolina colony from Spanish attacks. Local folklore and dedicated history have long suspected Fripp to be the location where Edward Teach, the pirate known as Blackbeard, had stowed away some of his treasures and bounty.

Max Meters of Day: Jim Reynolds – 15,040 meters

Milestones:
Over 125k Reached:
Paul Ipolito – 128,864

Over 100k Reached:
Tom Kosanke – 101,692

Over 25k Reached:
Anita Piccarretta – 26,987

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Jim Reynolds – 15,040

10k+ for the day
Nancy Harter – 12,850
Paul Ipolito – 11,039
Tom Kosanke – 10,650
Mary Clark – 10,480
Jen COlby – 10,095

5k+ for the day
Anita Piccarretta – 6,000

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 21 - Fripp Island, SC to Tybee Island, GA

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 21 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.

We are continuing to hold at 42nd out of 563 teams. Nine rowers erged a total of 79,710 meters (49.5 miles). We passed the 2 million mark with 2,057,852 total meters (1,278.7 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day at Fripp Island, SC and crossed into Georgia at Tybee Island. Along the way we continued to pass barrier islands including, Pritchards island, Hilton Head Island, Daufuskie Island and Turtle Island.

Places of Interest
Pritchard Island is owned by the University of South Carolina Beaufort. It is a remote barrier island located between Hilton Head and Hunting Island State Park and is accessible only by boat. Overnight visitors can stay at the Phillip Rhodes Barrier Island Research Facility, which has a maximum capacity of 18. Explore uninhabited beaches and pristine maritime forest. Surf fishing is excellent in the summer and fall. Summer participants can assist with the loggerhead sea turtle project, which includes nightly walks, assisting with tagging and measuring of turtles, and nest relocation. Events may range from family workshops, beach sweeps, photography workshops, and artist retreats…a great place to learn to value and protect those fragile ecosystems on our planet!

Hilton Head is a Lowcountry resort town located on an island of the same name. It is 95 miles southwest of Charleston and 20 miles northeast of Savannah, Georgia. The island is named after Captain William Hilton, who in 1663 named it after himself. The island features 12 miles of beachfront making it a popular vacation destination. The island has a rich history that started with seasonal occupation by Native Americans thousands of years ago, and continued with European exploration and the Sea Island Cotton trade. It became an important base of operations for the Union blockade of the Southern ports during the Civil War. Once the island fell to Union troops, hundreds of ex-slaves flocked to Hilton Head, which is still home to “native islanders”, many of whom are descendants of freed slaves known as the Gullah (or Geechee) who have managed to hold on to much of their ethnic and cultural identity.

Daufuskie Island, is located between Hilton Head Island and Savannah, GA is the southernmost sea island in South Carolina. It is 5 miles long by almost 2.5 miles wide with over 3 miles of beachfront. Daufuskie is accessible only by ferry or barge, and has a full-time population of just over 400. Daufuskie Island encompasses a rich cultural experience, with environmental preserves, private communities, resorts, Gullah houses, diverse art galleries and history.
Savannah is the oldest city in the Georgia. Established in 1733 on the Savannah River, the city of Savannah was a strategic port city in the American Revolution and during the American Civil War.  Savannah today is an industrial center and an important Atlantic seaport. It is Georgia’s fifth-largest city and third-largest metropolitan area. Savannah’s downtown area, which includes the Savannah Historic District, the Savannah Victorian Historic District, and 22 parklike squares, is one of the largest National Historic Landmark Districts in the US. Downtown Savannah largely retains the original town plan prescribed by founder James Oglethorpe. Each year Savannah attracts millions of visitors to its cobblestone streets, parks, and notable historic buildings.
Tybee Island is the easternmost point in the state of Georgia. The small island, which has long been a quiet getaway for the residents of Savannah, has become a popular vacation spot with tourists from outside the Savannah metropolitan area. One famous resident is John Cougar Mellencamp who purchased his home from a former Rochesterian. Tybee Island is one of the few locations where the U.S. Air Force dropped an atomic bomb—by accident (during a botched 1958 military training exercise). Though the “Tybee Bomb” did not detonate (and, according to some reports, was not armed with a fuse), there has been ongoing concern, since the Mark 15 nuclear bomb lost during the mishap was never found.

Max Meters of Day: Jen Brayer – 19,462 meters

Milestones:
Over 125k Reached:
Jen Brayer – 127,341

Over 75k Reached:
Mary Clark – 87,040

Over 50k Reached:
Nancy Harter – 52,243

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day
Jen Brayer – 19,462
Paul Ipolito – 15,204
Mary Clark – 15,092

5k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 6,798
Betsy Nitschke – 6,672
Nancy Harter – 6,575
Francesca Scumaci – 5,893

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Week 3 – Progress Map

GWC Virtual Challenge Journey progress

GWC’s Third Week Progress Map.

Fourth Week’s Progress

Day 22 - Tybee Island, GA to St. Catherines Island, GA

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 22 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. A light day yesterday sent us back to 44th place out of 563 teams. For complete standings go to JVTC Standings

Three rowers erged a total of 35,593 meters (22.1 miles). We have travelled 2,083,975 total meters (1,295 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day at Tybee Island, GA, crossed Wassaw Sound and passed by Wassaw National Wildlife Refuge. We crossed the mouth of the Little Ogeechee River, rowed along the coast of Ossabaw Island, crossed St. Catherines Sound and ended the day at St. Catherines Island.

Places of Interest
Wassaw Sound was the location of an American Civil War naval battle between the CSS Atlanta and Union ships in 1863. It was also the location of the sailing events in the 1996 Summer Olympics.

Wassaw Island was designated a National Wildlife Refuge on October 20, 1969. Unlike many of Georgia’s barrier islands, little development and few management practices have modified Wassaw’s primitive character. The 10,053-acre refuge includes beaches with rolling dunes, maritime forest, and vast salt marshes. Salt marsh and tidal creeks separate the refuge from the mainland and Skidaway Island to the west. As a day use destination, refuge visitors enjoy birdwatching, beachcombing, hiking and general nature studies. Birdwatching is particularly fruitful during the spring and fall migrations.

Ossabaw Island is one of the largest of Georgia’s barrier islands and is not linked to the mainland by bridge or causeway. It contains 9,000 acres of wooded uplands with freshwater ponds and 16,000 acres of marshlands interlaced with tidal creeks. Use of the island is regulated by the Ossabaw Island Foundation and the general public must apply to visit. Ossabaw is open to groups engaged in study, research and education.

St. Catherines Island stands apart from the other ecologically and culturally significant barrier islands on the Georgia coast. While it shares a diverse mix of ecological and cultural resources, it is widely known and valued for its globally significant archaeological sites and its history of research, education, and conservation. It is also unique in that the island is privately owned, with the St. Catherines Island and the Edward J. Noble Foundations (SCIF, EJNF) supporting the conservation of the Island’s resources and the extensive research and education, all for the public good.

Max Meters of Day: Tamara Abbott – 12,006 meters (just squeezed by Francesca by only 6 meters)

Milestones:
Over 175k Reached:
Tamara Abbott – 184,061

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Tamara Abbot – 12,006
Francesca Scumaci – 12,000
Jen Brayer – 11,587

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 23 - St. Catherines Island, GA to

Day 24 - Jekyll Island, GA past Daytona Beach, FL

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 23 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Only 7 more days left in the challenge!

WOW!! Great effort yesterday! Yesterday’s practice at GWC contributed a lot of meters! Thanks Ethan! It was a challenging workout and from what I heard around me, athletes were pleased with their results and now have a new split to work off of for their workouts.

For those who weren’t there, yesterday’s practice was a 4x2k (at 5k or T20 pace) benchmark set. Rest between was 1250 meters at zone 1 pace (30-35” slower than pace on work pieces). Once the warm-up meters, set meters, rest meters and cool down meters were added in, we got great distance for our journey!

That push yesterday moved us up to 42nd place out of 563 teams. We blew past Mic Mac ACC by over 100k!

**Don’t forget to sign-up to erg this Sunday in the GWC training room! If you haven’t been to a practice there yet, the old conference room has had an amazing transformation and the 15 brand new ergs are amazingly smooth! We’ll have a large screen TV, snacks and good company to get some meters in.

Fourteen rowers erged yesterday for a total of 185,707 meters (115.4 miles). We have travelled 2,355,139 total meters (1,463.4 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day at Jekyll Island, GA and crossed Saint Andrew Sound and travelled the coastline of Cumberland Island. We crossed into Florida waters at the confluence of the St Marys and Amelia Rivers. We passed by Jacksonville and it’s many beaches, rowed by St. Augustine and ended the day between Palm Coast and Daytona Beach at the Tomoka Marsh Aquatic Preserve.

Places of Interest
Cumberland Island is Georgia’s largest and southernmost barrier island. Here pristine maritime forests, undeveloped beaches and wide marshes whisper the stories of both man and nature. Natives, missionaries, enslaved African Americans and Wealthy Industrialists all walked here. Cumberland Island is also home to over 9,800 acres of Congressionally designated Wilderness.

Amelia Island is 13 miles (21 km) long and approximately 4 miles (6.4 km) wide at its widest point. The communities of Fernandina Beach and Amelia City are both located on the island. The island was named for Princess Amelia, daughter of George II of Great Britain, and has changed hands between colonial powers a number of times. It is claimed that eight flags have flown over Amelia Island: French, Spanish, British, Patriot, Green Cross, Mexican, Confederate, and United States. The Amelia Island Trail is a part of the East Coast Greenway,a 3,000 mile-long system of trails connecting Maine to Florida.

Jacksonville is the most populous city in both the state of Florida and the southeastern United States and is the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. It is the cultural, commercial and financial center of North Florida. A major military and civilian deep-water port, supporting two US Navy bases and the Port of Jacksonville, Florida’s third largest seaport.

St. Augustine was founded in 1565 by the Spanish conquistador, Pedro Menéndez de Avilés. It is the oldest continuously occupied settlement of European origin in the contiguous United States.

Max Meters of Day: George Morgan – 18,488 – not bad for a novice!

Milestones:
Over 200k Reached:
Tamara Abbott – 201,908

Over 175k Reached:
Jim Reynolds – 177,084

Over 125k Reached
Betsy Nitschke – 135,928

Over 75k Reached
Nancy Harter – 78,995

Shout outs:
15k+ for the day (a record number!)
George Morgan – 18,488
Tamara Abbott – 17,847
Taz Zavery – 16,730
Jen Colby – 17,710
Betsy Nitschke – 15,579
Paul Ipolito – 15,297

10k+ for the day
Nancy Harter – 13752
Mary Clark – 10,323
JB – 10,263
Francesca Scumaci – 10,244
Esther Tanzman – 10,000

5k+ for the day
Jim Reynolds – 8,320
Lisa Norwood – 7,237

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 25 - Tomoka Marsh Aquatic Preserve to Canaveral National Seashore, FL

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 25 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Only 6 more days left in the challenge!

We are still in 42nd place out of 563 teams but Forum Flyers is only 15k behind us. Let’s try and hold them off!

**Don’t forget to sign-up to erg this Sunday in the GWC training room! If you haven’t been to a practice there yet, the old conference room has had an amazing transformation and the 15 brand new ergs are amazingly smooth! We’ll have a large screen TV, snacks and good company to get some meters in.

Eleven rowers erged yesterday for a total of 94,272 meters (58.6 miles). We have travelled 2,449,411 total meters (1,521 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day at the Tomoka Marsh Aquatic Preserve in Florida. Traveling the coast we passed Daytona Beach, Port Orange, Ponce Inlet, Edgewater, Bethune Beach, Eldora and ended the day along the Canaveral National Seashore.

Places of Interest
Daytona Beach is especially known for auto racing and is home to NASCAR headquarters. Daytona’s wide beach of smooth, compacted sand attracted automobile and motorcycle races as early as 1902. It is also a well known Spring Break destination for college students in the northeast.

The Ponce de Leon Inlet Lighthouse is a lighthouse and museum located at Ponce de León Inlet. At 175 feet in height, it is the tallest lighthouse in the state and one of the tallest in the United States. The first lighthouse was built in 1825, was poorly constructed and never went into service. It collapsed in 1826. Many shipwrecks occurred along the coast but another lighthouse wasn’t completed until 1887.

Eldora was a prominent community of orange groves in the latter part of the 19th century. After a freeze destroyed most of its crops, it was nearly completely abandoned and has never regained its population. Eldora’s last resident, Doris “Doc” Leeper died in 2000. She was a locally famous artist and conservationist in the 1980s. Visitation to the area is limited and subject to park hours. Only two of its original buildings remain. The largest, “The Eldora House”, now holds a museum.

The Canaveral National Seashore, is a 24-mile long stretch of undeveloped land on a federally protected barrier island. The John F. Kennedy Space Center is located at the southern end of the island. Mosquito Lagoon borders the other side of the cape from the seashore. Canaveral National Seashore is a recreational paradise and offers backcountry camping, canoeing, kayaking, fishing, swimming, boating, bird watching opportunities and more.

Max Meters of Day: George Morgan – 12,128

Milestones:
Over 225k Reached:
Jen Colby – 226,657

Over 175k Reached:
Paul Ipolito – 181,576

Over 150k Reached
George Morgan – 157,696

Over 100k Reached
Mary Clark – 103,773

Over 50k Reached
Esther Tanzman – 50,784
Patrick Trudeau – 50,760

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
George Morgan – 12,128
Jim Reynolds – 11,030
Mary Clark – 10,410
Paul Ipolito – 10,026

5k+ for the day
Betsy Nitschke – 9,382
Patrick Trudeau – 8,949
Jen Colby – 8,124
Esther Tanzman – 5,075

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 26 - Canaveral National Seashore toPalm Bay, FL

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 26 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Only 5 more days left in the challenge!

We are in 42nd place out of 575 teams. Forum Flyers is now 43k behind us. Let’s continue to increase that distance! We’re trailing CLRA (Carnegie Lake Rowing Association, Princeton, NJ) by 222.8k. Let’s try to lessen that gap!

**Don’t forget to sign-up to erg this Sunday in the GWC training room! If you haven’t been to a practice there yet, the old conference room has had an amazing transformation and the 15 brand new ergs are amazingly smooth! We’ll have a large screen TV, snacks and good company to get some meters in.

Twelve rowers erged yesterday for a total of 84,769 meters (52.7 miles). We have travelled 2,534,178 total meters (1,574.7 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day along the Canaveral National Seashore. The temperature is in the mid-sixties and there is a breeze out of the north-west. Overall a pretty nice day to be out on the water. Our route today took us past Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Cocoa Beach, Patrick Air Force Base, Satellite Beach, Indian Harbour Beach, Melbourne Beach  Turtle Bay, Stonehenge and ended the day in Palm Bay.

Places of Interest
Cape Canaveral Air Force Station area had been used by the United States government to test missiles since 1949. It was known as the Cape Kennedy Air Force Station from 1963-73. The location was among the best in the continental US for this purpose, as it allowed for launches out over the Atlantic Ocean, and is close to the equator, allowing rockets to get a boost from the Earth’s rotation. A number of American space exploration “firsts” were launched from CCAFS including satellites and manned spacecraft. There is a museum located at Launch Complex 26 and it is accessible to the general public. A virtual tour can be found here

Port Canaveral is a cruise, cargo and naval port and is one of the busiest cruise ports in the world. As a deep water cargo port, it has a high volume of traffic. On average, 10 ships per day enter the port.

Cocoa/Cocoa Beach is a popular vacation destination and known for excellent small wave surfing. A short video can be found here  Several stories circulate among Cocoa old timers as to how the town got its name. One story says that the mail used to come by river boat and was placed in an empty tin box labeled Baker’s Cocoa. Additionally, an early hotel in the area, located on the Indian River lagoon, was named Cocoa House.

Patrick Air Force Base was named in honor of Major General Mason Patrick. It is an Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) base, and home to the 45th Space Wing (45 SW). In addition to its “host wing” responsibilities, the 45 SW controls and operates Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and the Eastern Range. It was originally opened and operated from 1940-1947 as a US Navy airfield but deactivated in 1947. It was transferred to the Air Force in late 1948. Additional tenant activities at Patrick AFB include the 920th Rescue Wing, the Air Force Technical Applications Center and the Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI). Total employment is 10,400 and there are 13,099 military, dependents, civilian employees and contractors on base.

Max Meters of Day: Tamara Abbott – 12,513

Milestones:
Over 150k Reached:
Betsy Nitschke – 157,119

Over 125k Reached
JB – 130,778

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 12,513
Jen Colby – 12,222
Betsy Nitschke – 11,809
George Morgan – 11,089

5k+ for the day
Francesca Scumaci – 7,780
JB – 7,016
Jen Brayer – 5,659

All Meters are Good Meters
Taz Zavery – 2,158
Jen Hayes – 2.033

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 27 - Palm Bay to Avalon State Park, FL

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 27 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Only 5 more days left in the challenge!

We are back down to 43rd place out of 575 teams. Forum Flyers is now 13k ahead of us. Let’s work on getting that lead back!

**Don’t forget to sign-up to erg this Sunday in the GWC training room! If you haven’t been to a practice there yet, the old conference room has had an amazing transformation and the 15 brand new ergs are amazingly smooth! We’ll have a large screen TV, snacks and good company to get some meters in.

Five rowers erged yesterday for a total of 47,016 meters (29.2 miles). We have travelled 2,586,220 total meters (1,607 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day in Palm Bay, passed by the city of Vero Beach and ended our short day at Avalon State Park just north of St. Lucie.

Max Meters of Day: Mary Clark – 10,099

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Mary Clark – 10,099

5k+ for the day
JB – 7,248
Tamara Abbott – 5,200

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 28 - Avalon State Park to North Palm Beach, FL

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 28 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Only 5 more days left in the challenge!

We are down to 41st place out of 575 teams. Forum Flyers are only 1.5k ahead which means we should easily pass them during our erg-athon today. For complete standings go to JVTC Standings

*It’s not to late to come to GWC’s training room today to erg with the group! We will have movies, snacks, brand new shiny ergs and best of all – good company!

Ten rowers erged yesterday for a total of 78,927 meters (49 miles). We have travelled 2,670,159 total meters (1,659 miles) for the challenge!

We started the day at Avalon State Park, FL. Our day’s voyage took us past Jensen Beach  Jupiter Island and Juno Beach  We finished the day in North Palm Beach.

Max Meters of Day: Tamara Abbott – 13,102

Milestones
250k+ Total Meters
Jen Colby – 253,919
225k+ Total Meters
Tamara Abbott – 232,723

150k+ Total Meters
Jen Brayer – 155,138

Shout outs:
10k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 13,102
Jen Brayer – 10,551
Mary Clark – 10,035
Jen Colby – 10,024

5k+ for the day
Nancy Harter – 8,814
Jen Hayes – 8,628
JB – 7,238

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Week 4 – Progress Map

2017GWC_Virtual Challenge Journey Map progress

GWC’s Fourth Week Progress Map.

The Last Three Days!

Day 29 - North Palm Beach to Everglades National Park, FL with PHOTOS

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 29 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge.
Only 2 more days left in the challenge!

WOW! A great Sunday effort and our max meter day for the challenge! We moved up two places to 42nd place out of 577 teams! Forum Flyers fell back to 44th. CF HML Finland, a cross-fit team, is on our tail and trailing by only 118 meters! We are only 31.6k behind ACR’s Ergatory.

We had eight rowers come to our ergathon held at GWC. Some came for a couple hours and a few for the entire time – a great overall effort and lots of fun! The Boy in Blue, Miracle at Oxford and Looney Tunes entertained us as we forged ahead. Excellent snacks fueled us through the long day’s journey along Florida’s southeast coast. A few photos taken near the end of the ergathon are attached. Unfortunately we didn’t get one early on with all the rowers.

Eleven rowers erged yesterday, for a total of 236,477 meters (146.9 miles). We have travelled 2,906,610 total meters (1,806.1 miles) for the challenge! 3 million meters for the challenge is within our grasp as long as we all keep at it these last two days!

We started the day in North Palm Beach, FL. We passed the popular vacation destinations of Boynton Beach Delray Beach, Boca Raton, Pompano Beach Fort Lauderdale and Miami. We rowed through Biscayne Bay, Card Sound, Blackwater Sound, and cut through Jewfish Creek to Florida Bay. We rowed between the mainland and Key Largo finishing the day in Everglades National Park and setting-up camp at Shark Point Chickee in the Everglades.

Places of Interest
Recorded history of the Del Ray Beach area began with the construction of the Orange Grove House of Refuge in 1876. The house derived its name from the grove of mature sour orange and other tropical fruit trees found at the site. The Houses of Refuge along the coast of Florida were a series of stations operated by the United States Life-Saving Service to rescue and shelter ship-wrecked sailors. Settlement began around 1884, when African-Americans from the Panhandle of Florida purchased land and began farming. By 1894 the Black community was large enough to establish the first school in the area.
Boca Raton was originally occupied by the Tequesta tribe, a Native American people that occupied an area along the southeastern Atlantic coast of Florida. The area was largely uninhabited after the Indigenous people were cleared from the area by the Spanish and the British. The first significant European settler to this area was Captain Thomas Moore Rickards in 1895, who resided in a house made of driftwood. Early settlement in the area increased shortly after Henry Flagler’s expansion of the Florida East Coast Railway, connecting West Palm Beach to Miami. In 1904, Japanese farmers of the Yamato Colony converted the land west of the city into pineapple plantations. However, this colony never grew very large due to a blight that destroyed much of their crops and by the 1920s, many of the colonists had returned to Japan. During World War II, much of their land was confiscated and used as the site of the Boca Raton Army Air Force Base, a major training facility for B-29 bomber crews and radar operators. Much of the Boca Raton Army Airfield was later donated to Palm Beach County and became the grounds of Florida Atlantic University.
Fort Lauderdale is a popular tourist destination, with an average year-round temperature of 75.5 °F, and 3,000 hours of sunshine per year. The district has 561 hotels and motels comprising nearly 35,000 rooms. Forty six cruise ships sailed from Port Everglades in 2012. Greater Fort Lauderdale has over 4,000 restaurants, 63 golf courses, 12 shopping malls, 16 museums, 132 nightclubs, 278 parkland campsites, and 100 marinas housing 45,000 resident yachts. Fort Lauderdale is named after a series of 3 forts built by the US during the Second Seminole War. However, development of the city did not begin until 50 years after the forts were abandoned at the end of the conflict. On July 4, 1961 African Americans started a series of protests, wade-ins, at beaches that were off-limits to them, to protest “the failure of the county to build a road to the Negro beach”. On July 11, 1962 a verdict by Ted Cabot went against the city’s policy of racial segregation of public beaches.
Hollywood was founded in 1925 by Joseph W. Young. He dreamed of building a motion picture colony on the East Coast of the US and named the town “Hollywood by the Sea” to distinguish it from Hollywood, California. Young had a vision of having lakes, golf courses, a luxury beach hotel, country clubs, and a main street, Hollywood Boulevard. After the 1926 Miami hurricane, Hollywood was severely damaged; local newspapers reported that Hollywood was second only to Miami in losses from the storm. Following Young’s death in 1934, the city encountered more terrific hurricanes and not only that, with the stock market crash it felt as though the city was tumbling slowly piece by piece with all of the tragic events taking place.
Miami is a leader in finance, commerce, culture, media, entertainment, the arts, and international trade. In 2010, Miami ranked seventh in the US in terms of finance, commerce, culture, entertainment, fashion, education, and other sectors. It ranked 33rd among global cities. In 2008, Forbes magazine ranked Miami “America’s Cleanest City”, for its year-round good air quality, vast green spaces, clean drinking water, clean streets, and citywide recycling programs. Miami is nicknamed the “Capital of Latin America” and is the largest city with a Cuban-American plurality. Miami has the third tallest skyline in the U.S. with over 300 high-rises. Downtown Miami is home to the largest concentration of international banks in the United States, and many large national and international companies. For more than two decades, the Port of Miami, known as the “Cruise Capital of the World”, has been the number one cruise passenger port in the world. Metropolitan Miami is the major tourism hub in the American South, number two in the U.S. after New York City and number 13 in the world, including the popular destination of Miami Beach.
Biscayne Bay is divided into three parts. The North Bay lies between Miami Beach barrier island and Miami on the mainland. Central Bay is the largest part of the bay. Both the North Bay and Central Bay have been severely affected over the last century by raw sewage releases, urban runoff, shoreline bulkheading, dredging, the creation of artificial islands and the loss of natural fresh water flow into the bay. However, water quality has steadily improved since regular monitoring began in 1979. South Bay is nearly as large as Central Bay, and is the least affected by human activities, although it also suffers from the loss of natural fresh water flow. South Bay is separated from the Straits of Florida by the northernmost of the Florida Keys, and includes Card Sound and Barnes Sound. It is connected to Florida Bay through a few small channels.

Key Largo is an island in the upper Florida Keys archipelago and is the largest section at 33 miles (53 km) long. Its earlier Spanish name was Cayo Largo, meaning Long Small Island. Key Largo is a popular tourist destination and calls itself the “Diving Capital of the World” because the living coral reef a few miles offshore attracts thousands of scuba divers and sport-fishing enthusiasts. Key Largo’s proximity to the Everglades also makes it a premier destination for kayakers and ecotourists.

Jewfish Creek is named after a voracious grouper that can grow to more than 6 feet. A scientific committee decided the old common name was in bad taste and renamed the fish “Atlantic Goliath Grouper,” but the former name lives on in Jewfish Creek. A Washington, D.C. area resident wants to change that. In a petition to a federal panel on geographic names, Arnold G. Konheim has objected that “the word ‘Jew’ in any form other than a noun is derogatory.” He also noted that since the fish itself now has a different name, so should the inlet that separates Key Largo from Florida’s mainland peninsula.

Everglades National Park is the largest tropical wilderness, the largest wilderness of any kind east of the Mississippi River, and is visited on average by 1 million people each year. It is the third-largest national park in the lower 48 states after Death Valley and Yellowstone. It has been declared an International Biosphere Reserve, a World Heritage Site, and a Wetland of International Importance. Humans have lived for thousands of years in or around the Everglades until plans arose in 1882, to drain the wetlands and develop the recovered land for agricultural and residential use. As the 20th century progressed, water flow from Lake Okeechobee was increasingly controlled and diverted to enable explosive growth of the South Florida metropolitan area. The park was established in 1934, to protect the quickly vanishing Everglades, and dedicated in 1947. The ecosystems in Everglades National Park have suffered significantly from human activity, and restoration of the Everglades is a politically charged issue in South Florida. Thirty-six federally protected animals live in the park, some of which face grave threats to their survival. In the US, the American crocodile’s only habitat is within South Florida. They were once overhunted for their hides. but are protected today from hunting. They are still threatened due to habitat destruction and injury from vehicle collisions but populations of both crocodiles and alligators have increased and in 2007 were reclassified from “endangered” to “threatened.”

The Shark Point Chickee (see attached photo) is a camping platform situated in the large body of open water of Florida Bay and considered the future for remote wilderness camping in the Everglades region.

Sunday's GWC ergathon Max Meters of Day: Paul Ipolito – 37,685

Milestones
200k+ Total Meters
Paul Ipolito – 219,261
175k+ Total Meters
Jen Brayer – 189,791

125k+ Total Meters
Mary Clark – 134,519
Francesca Scumaci – 130,717

75k+ Total Meters
Jen Hayes – 91,384

50k+ Total Meters
Taz Zavery – 61,657
Lisa Norwood – 51,639

Shout outs:
30k+ for the day
Paul Ipolito – 37,685
Jen Brayer – 34,685

20k+ for the day
Jen Hayes – 24,149
Tamara Abbott – 23,384

15k+ for the day
Jen Colby – 18,203
Taz Zavery – 15,011

10k+ for the day
Esther Tanzman – 12,040
Lisa Norwood – 11,386
Francesca Scumaci – 11,001
Mary Clark – 10,612

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 30 - Shark Point in the Everglades to Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge, FL

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the Day 30 captain’s report for the Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. Today is the last day of the challenge!

Another great effort yesterday! We held on to 42nd place out of 577 teams! CF HML is now 97,661 meters behind us and CLRA is only 66,270 meters ahead. Finish strong on this last day! I’d like to see a GWC JVTC record for the number of crew members logging in meters! The GWC erg room is open for practice tonight 6-7:30pm and Ethan will be coaching. If you haven’t come to Tuesday practice before, give it a try tonight!

Nine rowers erged yesterday, for a total of 125,856 meters (78.2 miles). We have travelled 3,032,466 total meters (1,884.3 miles) for the challenge! We passed the 3 million meter mark but we’re not stopping there! Let’s try to get to Sarasota by the end of the day for a visit with crew member, and former GWC coach – John (JB) Bernfield! We have 205,996 meters (128 miles) to go! We can do it if we all pull together!

We started the day after a restful night atop the camping platforms at Shark Point in the Everglades. Our day’s journey continued through the Everglades. We rounded the southern-most point in the continental US and entered the Gulf of Mexico. We finished the day near Everglades City and set up camp on a small island in the Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge.

Places of Interest
The Ten Thousand Islands are a chain of islands and mangrove islets off the coast of southwest Florida, between Cape Romano (at the southern end of Marco Island) and the mouth of Lostman’s River. Some of the islands are high spots on a Submergent coastline. Others were produced by mangroves growing on oyster bars. Despite the name, the islets in the chain only number in the hundreds. The Ten Thousand Islands were used and occupied by Native Americans for thousands of years. Evidence of former living sites can be found under as much as four feet of water. Almost all of the Ten Thousand Islands are currently uninhabited. The largest, Chokoloskee Island, which is connected to Everglades City by a causeway, has about 400 permanent residents. Some of the Ten Thousand Islands are suitable for overnight visits, however this is a wilderness area where wind, weather and lack of fresh water can become threatening and the Wildlife Service recommends only seasoned canoeists and sea kayakers (AND ROWERS) attempt the trip. The southern tip has become a prime destination for snorkeling and water sports vacations.

Max Meters of Day: Tamara Abbott  – 22,215

Milestones
275k+ Total Meters
Jen Colby – 290,322
Tamara Abbott – 278,322
200k+ Total Meters
Jim Reynolds – 200,144

100k+ Total Meters
Nancy Harter – 101,166

Shout outs:
20k+ for the day
Tamara Abbott – 22,215

15k+ for the day
Jen Colby – 18,200

10k+ for the day
Nancy Harter – 13,357
Mary Clark – 12,620
Jim Reynolds – 12,030
Francesca Scumaci – 10,357
Tom Kosanke – 10,172

5k+ for the day
Anita Piccarretta – 5,000

GO TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen

Day 31 - Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge to Sarasota, Florida!!

Ahoy GWC Crew Members!

Here is the final captain’s report for the 2017 Team Genesee Waterways Concept 2 January Virtual Team Challenge. There are no more days in the challenge (for this year)!

UNBELIEVABLE! We had an incredible surge yesterday that pushed all us the way to our coveted destination of Sarasota, Florida! We had 15 crew members log 248,257 meters (154.3 miles) – Max participation AND max daily meters! Our final total for the challenge is 3,280,723 meters (2,038.6 miles)

We are in 41st place out of 577! Teams have until Saturday to log their final meters but CLRA is over 100k behind us so I’m pretty confident 41 will be our final placement.

We started the day at the Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge and after having spent the last couple days in the Everglades wilderness, we are happy to be back in civilization. We followed the coastline past Marco Island  The city of Naples  and headed into the calmer waters of Estero Bay at Big Hickory Island. We crossed San Carlos Bay to Sanibel and Captiva Islands then crossed over to Pine Island through Pine Island Sound  In Gasparilla Sound we passed Gasparilla Island and Don Pedro Island  Rowing into Lemon Bay  we passed Manasota Key on our port side and at South Venice we headed further inland traveling a canal-way leading to Roberts Bay. With Casey Key on port and the mainland on starboard Roberts Bay lead us to Little Sarasota Bay. This last stretch lead us to our final docking in Sarasota near a statue called Unconditional Surrender. There is nothing like finishing a long journey and being greeted by familiar faces – JB and his wife Nancy were waiting for us AND they very graciously offered to put us up until next January!! Thank you JB and Nancy!

Places of Interest
Sanibel Island is a popular tourist destination and is known for its shell beaches and wildlife refuges. More than half of the island is made up of wildlife refuges, the largest being J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge. The Island hosts the Sanibel Historical Village and a variety of other museums and theaters, as well as many non-profit organizations like the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife, and the Sanibel Sea School.

Pine Island is the largest island in Florida.Unlike the sandy barrier islands of Sanibel and Captiva, Pine Island has no large beach and is made from the same coral rock as the mainland. It is surrounded by mangroves and includes three aquatic preserves. Residents and visitors are attracted to Pine Island’s natural rural character, fishing, and boating. Pine Island is mostly zoned as agricultural and some visitors travel more than a hundred miles to purchase tropical fruit such as lychee and mangos.

Sarasota is renowned for its cultural and environmental amenities, beaches, resorts and the Sarasota School of Architecture. In the rowing world it is known for Nathan Benderson Park which was built to FISA racing standards. In addition to the race course the lake has multiple 1500 meter warm-up and cool down lanes. This is a great place to be spending the year! The World Rowing Championship will be held here September 24-October 1st.

Unconditional Surrender is a sculpture by Seward Johnson resembling a photograph by Alfred Eisenstaedt, V–J day in Times Square, but said by Johnson to be based on a similar, less well known, photograph by Victor Jorgensen. The original statue was first installed in Sarasota, Florida. Other versions have been installed in Hamilton, New Jersey; Pearl Harbor, Hawaii; and Normandy, France.

Max Meters of Day:  George Morgan  – 31,587

Milestones
300k+ Total Meters
Tamara Abbott – 308,322
Jen Colby – 304,297

225k+ Total Meters
Paul Ipolito – 231,035

200k+ Total Meters
Jen Brayer – 203,931
George Morgan – 200,372

150k+ Total Meters
Mary Clark – 165,251

100k+ Total Meters
Jen Hayes – 103,551

75k+ Total Meters
Taz Zavery – 76,086
Lisa Norwood – 75,516
Esther Tanzman – 73,143 (so close to 75k)

Shout outs:
30k+ for the day
George Morgan – 31,587
Tamara Abbott – 30,000

20k+ for the day
Lisa Norwood – 23,877

15k+ for the day
Mary Clark – 18,112
Jim Reynolds – 15,557
Nancy Harter – 15,463

10k+ for the day
Taz Zavery – 14,429
Jen Brayer – 14,140
Jen Colby – 13,975
Jen Hayes – 12,167
Paul Ipolito – 11,774
Tom Kosanke – 11,595

5k+ for the day
Esther Tanzman – 5,319
Anita Piccarretta – 5,000

JOB WELL DONE TEAM GWC!!!
Capt Karen


Our Eleven-month Layover Location!

We rowed into Sarasota last night, where John Bernfield and his wife Nancy live. They have offered to put us all up (virtually) till next January 1st! Here are a few photos taken of our welcoming committee (JB and Nancy) this morning.

JB at Sarasota's Bayfront

JB and Nancy in Sarasota

The Last 3 Days!

2017GWC_Virtual Challenge Journey Map progress

GWC’s Last 3 Days of Progress for January, 2017.

Click Here to read a congratulatory note from JB upon our arrival in Sarasota

Karen,

Your efforts to organize and make the voyage interesting were awesome. Well done!

Congrats to all who totaled up the mileage. Especially Jen and Tamara.  I haven’t looked at the final results but I know Karen quietly accumulated a huge volume of mileage. There are many others who should be proud of their mileage – happiness is a direction.  If you challenged yourself you are increasing fitness – your going in the right direction.

I would have liked to accumulated more mileage myself but illness and some hip pain prevented that.  As I told George I had to greet you from “sick bay”.

I managed to rally yesterday and get pictures at the monument. We even had a noon time beer at O’Leary’s Tiki Bar and Grill and listened to some “Parrot Head” music (wow has my life ever changed).

Anyway, since you are all here in Sarasota join us this evening on our deck for sunset over the Gulf about 6:15.  It is 75 and sunny.

Love.  JB

Below is an image of JB and Nancy Bernfield under a statue replicating the famous photograph from World War II’s V-J Day – of a sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square. This statue is located near our 11 month layover location, and was taken the morning after our virtual crew arrived in Sarasota!

Eisenstadt statue

Info for the 2018 Challenge

GWC January rowing challenge
Daily emails are sent out to rowers with our progress for the challenge and our journey. We also show our progress on Facebook. Emails include shout-outs when various milestones (like first 25k, most meters for the day, etc.) have been reached by individual crew members.

For more details go to Concept 2 Virtual Challenge on how all this works.

Click below for the steps to join the GWC Crew for this adventure:

1) Go to Concept 2 (a link is here) and create a Logbook (unless you already have one)
2) Bookmark the log page so it’s easy for you to go to every day
2) Click on “Teams” in the blue bar at the top of the Concept 2 web page
3) Click on “Choose a team” and start typing genesee. The list of teams will scroll. Click on “Genesee Waterways” (Genesee Rowing Club is not the same team)
4) Join the Virtual Team Challenge on the right-hand side of the page
5) Erg Away!!
5) IMPORTANT!! Log ALL your meters in your Concept 2 Logbook the same day you complete them. Don’t wait and log several days worth at a time or we won’t have an accurate daily distance. Remember… all meters are good meters! It doesn’t matter if they are completed during drills, warm-up, etc. They all count!

There are different methods you can use to log your meters. You can log them manually or use the smart phone app Erg Data (free) and connect via Bluetooth to PM 5 monitors. Most of the ergs at GWC have PM 5 monitors and several do at the PIRC (Pittsford Indoor Rowing Center). Many of the ergs at the PIRC use PM 3 & 4 monitors and do not have Bluetooth connectivity. To keep track of meters manually, you can shoot a photo with your phone of your erg monitor or you can write down your meters and time on a note pad or piece of paper. Be sure to keep track of ALL meters including warm-up, drills and cool down meters. ALL METERS COUNT! To enter your meters manually in your Concept 2 log you need to only enter the amount of time and number of meters. It’s easiest to enter each part of your workout separately so no math is involved. Be sure to enter the exact time (recorded to the 10th of a second) and number of meters. Don’t estimate.